Posted by: David Harley | July 27, 2018

Not looking phishy, and not hitting the panic button

An excellent article has just been published by my ESET colleague Lysa Myers. Companies actually compound the phishing problem when they send poorly thought-out messages that are indistinguishable from phishing messages, both to their own staff and to customers (some banks are particularly culpable here). As a result, recipients of such messages are conditioned into accepting without suspicion messages that don’t conform to good practice, and are more susceptible to being taken in by phishing messages. Hook, line, and sinker: How to avoid looking ‘phish-y’  In addition, Lysa points out an issue I hadn’t really considered: “An increasingly common scenario is phishy-looking emails sent by Software as a Service (SaaS) apps like those for fax or shipping services, human resource or accounting portals, collaboration tools, newsletters or even party planners.”

Another colleague (and long-time friend), Bruce P. Burrell, expands on the story I referred to briefly here – Sextortion and leaked passwords – with this article: I saw what you did…or did I? – “It might seem legit but there are several reasons why you should not always hit the panic button when someone claims to have your email password.” Not just a rehash of the news story, but the precursor to what I expect to be a very useful second article with advice from a seasoned security researcher.

It’s worth remembering that phishers and scammers love panicking you into acting incautiously.

David Harley

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